That girl who uses markers
Gotta go fast!

I’m horrible at scheduling my time, so I’m keeping this text rather simple. I wanted to post at least something on here before disappearing again. I had my first week of my apprenticeship and it was really great but I was also overwhelmed with all the information I received in one week. I came home friday and saturday I just met up with friends and talked about my first experiences I made. Anyway, I have no internet connection at the place I stay at during the week. I’ll be staying there this weekend as well, so I’ll be entirely gone for 2 weeks.

I’ll be writing a much better and thoughtful text once I’m back and talk about what happened.

See you guys later!

lrssasart:

I have submitted a 4 paged comic to a comic contest called Fumetto (2013) about 7 months ago. The event took place during the 16th to 24th of march in Luzern/Switzerland. I didn’t win but my comic was nominated and put on display. That was probably my happiest moment of the year. The theme was “justice” and I picked my OC Hilda to star in my comic.

Hilda and the Taxi fish belong to me.

Reblogging to let you guys know that I’ll be posting my art on this blog in the future and the current one for all my interests and other stuff.

I should be thankful that we even have internet connection available out here.

But it keeps kicking me out every 5 minutes or takes forever to load.

This shouldn’t aggravate me.

But it does.

deforrestkelley:

imagine spock with an afro

superwholocked-with-a-crossbow:

this is a kids show.

calm-your-cloaca:

derpypandaahoy:

Intelligence is just so hot omg

image

(I’ve recently gotten into the TMNT 2012 series and I think I have trouble getting out…)

I’ve been trying out some new coloring patterns and this is what happened.
Side note: This is related to a scene in a story that I’ve been developing the last few months. Sophie and Robert finally get an official story to them. And no, it’s not related to anything I’ve drawn/written about them before. Since this is still in working process I won’t reveal anything more about it since I’m pretty sure I won’t be able to start anything with it in the near future… or maybe ever. I’m lazy and never content with my results.

I’ve been trying out some new coloring patterns and this is what happened.

Side note: This is related to a scene in a story that I’ve been developing the last few months. Sophie and Robert finally get an official story to them. And no, it’s not related to anything I’ve drawn/written about them before. Since this is still in working process I won’t reveal anything more about it since I’m pretty sure I won’t be able to start anything with it in the near future… or maybe ever. I’m lazy and never content with my results.

ucresearch:

The visual linguistics of a comic book page
Inside Science recently wrote about the study by UCSD’s Neil Cohn, Navigating Comics, which looks at the underlying structure of the comics language:

People who read the English written word scan text from left to right. Once our eyes hit the end of the page, we stop. Then ding!, like an old-time typewriter, our eyes shift downward and snap back to the left to start reading the next line. This is known as a “Z-path,” as our eyes whip about like the end of Zorro’s sword.
But that linear track gets derailed in comics with complex layouts and Cohn wanted to know if experienced readers had strategies to follow along.
Cohn rustled up 145 participants at the 2004 Comic-Con International, a comic book convention held in San Diego. Participants had varying experience with reading comics, ranging from “never” to “often.”
Each participant was given a booklet containing 12 pages of blank panels. Each page was independent of the rest and used different design techniques.

Read More →

ucresearch:

The visual linguistics of a comic book page


Inside Science recently wrote about the study by UCSD’s Neil Cohn, Navigating Comics, which looks at the underlying structure of the comics language:

People who read the English written word scan text from left to right. Once our eyes hit the end of the page, we stop. Then ding!, like an old-time typewriter, our eyes shift downward and snap back to the left to start reading the next line. This is known as a “Z-path,” as our eyes whip about like the end of Zorro’s sword.

But that linear track gets derailed in comics with complex layouts and Cohn wanted to know if experienced readers had strategies to follow along.

Cohn rustled up 145 participants at the 2004 Comic-Con International, a comic book convention held in San Diego. Participants had varying experience with reading comics, ranging from “never” to “often.”

Each participant was given a booklet containing 12 pages of blank panels. Each page was independent of the rest and used different design techniques.

Read More →